Tag Archives: shapes

STAR LIGHT STAR BRIGHT MAY I HAVE UNINTERRUPTED SLEEP TONIGHT?

sleep deprivation 2 sleep deprivation

Hi this is Terri Borman child care provider and author of “Shapes Go to School.”  One of the most common complaints I hear from parents as they drop their kiddos off in the morning is about their sleep deprivation.  They are holding their eyes open with toothpicks and looking for the Folgers so they can wake up.  What is causing their lack of sleep?  Well, if you guessed their children kept them up all night, then you are correct. This isn’t just a phenomena happening at my child care…. It’s a phenomena happening all across the USA.

The National Sleep Foundation recently released its annual “Sleep in America” poll.  They polled parents to see how much sleep their child usually gets per night.  The estimates were well below the foundation’s recommendations for all age levels.

The National Sleep Foundation recommends preschoolers (ages 3 to 5) to get between 11 to 13 hours of sleep per night.  School aged kids (ages 5 to 10) should get between 10 to 11 hours of sleep per night. Teens (ages 11-17) should get 8.5 to 9.5 hours of sleep per night.

So what’s the solution to this widespread problem?  I researched several articles and came to this conclusion for getting a better night’s sleep.  First of all, children need to follow a nightly bedtime routine that is consistent.  A consistent bedtime routine makes it easier for your child to fall asleep and sleep through the night. 

Set a bedtime that is at the same time every night.  Make bedtime relaxing with no television or videos.  According to Dr. Shelby Harris, a sleep psychologist and director of the Behavioral Sleep Medicine program at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City, the blue light from device screens makes our brains think it is daytime and stops producing melatonin.  Melatonin is produced in the brain when the sun goes down, signaling that bedtime is coming within a few hours, and melatonin helps to regulate sleep.

Here is a sample bedtime routine:

1.)    Make a light snack.  Bananas, avocado, peanuts, almonds, figs and milk based drinks all contain tryptophans, which aide in the production of melatonin. 

 2.)    Have your child take a warm bath or shower.

 3.)    Have your child put on comfortable pajamas.  FYI, don’t let them put on the outfit they picked for the next day or at least draw the line at the shoes.  Yes true story I did catch my daughter in bed with her shoes on once.

 4.)    Have your child brush their teeth.

 5.)    Read with your child a book like for example “Shapes Go to School” available at Amazon.com.  Sorry I had to throw my book a plug.  Did you also like the title of this article Star Light Star Bright?  I thought it tied into the book nicely too!  Kudo’s to Pinterest for the help!

 6.)    Make sure the room is at a comfortable temperature.  You may want to run a fan for the white noise and for air circulation.  If the weather is cool, I will still run the fan for the white noise but I don’t let it blow directly on the children.

 7.)    Put your child to bed awake and encourage them to fall asleep on their own.  A child who can fall asleep on their own will be able to return to sleep during night time awakenings.  Infants who are put to bed tired but not asleep, are more likely to become self-soothers which allows them to fall asleep independently at bedtime and put themselves back to sleep during the night time.  Infants should be put on their backs to sleep with nothing in their beds except a passifier.  Swaddling is no longer an accepted practice and is considered dangerous to infants 8 weeks and older.

Be blessed and to all the parent’s out there happy dreams,

Terri Borman

My sources:

http://www.katv.com/story/24887696/sleep-study-school-aged-children-not-getting-enough-sleep

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/03/02/melatonin-pills-for-kids-safe-sleep-solution/

http://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-topics/children-and-sleep

http://www.sleepforkids.org/html/uskids.html

http://www.parenting.com/article/how-to-get-your-child-to-sleep-really?page=0,0

http://www.wikihow.com/Fall-Asleep

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When the Weather Outside is Friiightning!

Hi this is Terri Borman author of “Shapes Go to School.”  I am also a child care provider and when I cannot take the children outside due to bad weather I try to find learning activities I can do with the children inside.  Today I am going to show you how to have an indoor treasure shape hunt by hiding shapes around the house.

Directions:

STEP 1.) Cut out shapes from foam squares available from any craft store.

images

STEP 2.) Hide the shapes around the house.

STEP 3.) Draw a treasure map.

Pirate Map

To print out this color pirate map template (you must use a color printer) use this link below.

http://timvandevall.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/treasure-map-template-3.jpg

If you don’t have a color printer, and you want to make a treasure map on plain paper click on this link below.

Pirate Map Plain Paper

http://www.teachingideas.co.uk/themes/pirates/

STEP 4.) Help make the children pirate hats! ARRRRGGG

Pirate Hat APirate Hat BPirate Hat CPirate Hat EPirate Hat DPirate Hat FPirate Hat G

To see full instructions for making a pirate hat click on the link below.

http://www.uggabugga.com/Arts%20&%20Crafts/Origami/Origami%20-%20Hat%20Instructions.htm

STEP 5.) Have the children go find the treasure shapes and have FUN!! Get your copy of “Shapes Go to School” from these fine retailers:

Amazon.com, Barnesandnoble.com, and Authorhouse.com

Try This Free Activity Worksheet From Shapes Go to School

Hi everyone this is Terri Borman author of Shapes Go to School and a child care provider.  I hope you enjoyed last weeks activity worksheet which let your children color all the shapes that are in the book “Shapes Go to School.”

This week I have made you another activity worksheet called Shapes Go to School Activity Worksheet Squares.  This worksheet will let your children trace the squares and then color them blue.

Remember you have to hold the control button and then click on the link below.  It will then pop up a tab at the top of your browser.  Click on the tab at the top of your browser to see and print the new activity worksheet.

As always be blessed and have a great week!

Terri Borman

IMAG0344

Shapes Go to School Activity Worksheet Squares

Activity You Can Do With Your Kids After Reading Shapes Go to School

Hi this is Terri Borman author of “Shapes Go to School.”  I am also a child care provider so I am always looking for activities that I can do with the children that correlate with the book we are currently reading.

For this weeks blog, I have created an activity worksheet for the children to color that correlates with “Shapes Go to School.”  This worksheet reinforces the shapes that they have learned from reading the story.  It’s also great memory practice for the children because they have to remember what colors the shapes were in the story and color them the same color.  If they cannot remember what color a certain shape was in the story, they can practice problem solving by looking in the book.

To access this worksheet press control and click on the link below. This will open up a tab at the top of your browser.  Click on the tab called Shapes Go to School Activity Sheet to see and print the worksheet.

If you would like to purchase a personally signed copy of “Shapes Go to School,” please contact me directly at shapesgotoschool@gmail.com.  Otherwise the book is available at these retailers. Authorhouse, Amazon, and Barnes and Noble.

Please enjoy this worksheet!

Shapes Go to School Activity Sheet

What Can the Shape Children Teach Your Children

00B0B_dGlSBFfHl9M_600x450      Hi this is Terri Borman, author of “Shapes Go to School.”  This week I want to blog about what the shape children can teach your children.  The shape children will teach your children about shapes and colors, but what I really want to talk about is how the shape children will teach your children about diversity, self-esteem, and being a good friend.

diversity1     The shape children will teach your children about diversity.  The Merriam-Webster definition of diversity is as follows: “the condition of having or being composed of differing elements:  variety; especially:  the inclusion of different types of people (as people of different races or cultures) in a group or organization <programs intended to promote diversity in schools.”  When reading “Shapes Go to School,” your children will learn that all children come in different shapes, sizes, and colors.

self-esteem     Now let’s talk about self-esteem.  Is having a positive self-esteem something we are born with like a personality characteristic (trait) or is it learned?   I believe it is something that is learned and at a young age.  According to an article titled “Self-Esteem” published by CMHC UT Counseling and Mental Health Center “Our self-esteem evolves throughout our lives as we develop an image of ourselves through our experiences with different people and activities.  Experiences during childhood play a particularly large role in the shaping of self-esteem. When we were growing up, our successes, failures, and how we were treated by our family, teachers, coaches, religious authorities, and peers, all contributed to the creation of our self-esteem.”   The shape children from “Shapes Go to School” will teach your children to have a positive self-esteem and to believe in themselves.

good friends      Lastly, I would like to tell you that the shape children will teach your children how to be a good friend to each other.  They will teach your children how to pick someone up who is down through encouraging words.  I would like to end with this, “the only way to have a friend is to be one.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

I would like to thank these resources:

http://cmhc.utexas.edu/selfesteem.html

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/diversity

http://en.wikipedia.ord/wiki/Self-esteem

What Readers Will Take Away From Children’s Book “Shapes Go to School”

00B0B_dGlSBFfHl9M_600x450 “Shapes Go to School” is a fun and educational book for young children.  The very cute shape children from “Shapes Go to School” are going to elementary school for their first time.   Some of the shape children are excited to go to school while some are sad and scared.

Their teacher, Miss Heart, has asked each child to come up and introduce themselves.  One by one the shape children come up and introduce themselves and tell the readers the name of their shape.  They also tell the readers how many sides they have and what colors they are.  Readers will learn about ten shapes and colors.

One of the shape children, Circle, is sad and scared.  He feels like he doesn’t fit in because he is different.  He doesn’t have any sides like the other shape children because he is a round shape.  Miss Heart and Star comfort and encourage Circle.  In the end, Circle realizes that his teacher and friends are right.  He is special and useful just the way he is!

Overall here is what readers will take away from “Shapes Go to School.”  Readers will learn about ten basic shapes and colors.  They will learn about diversity because all the shape children are different shapes, sizes, and colors just like other boys and girls.   Most importantly readers will learn about having a positive self-esteem and realize that they are special and useful just the way they are!