Monthly Archives: May 2014

If Vaccines Don’t Cause Autism, Then What Does? Part One

  Hi this is Terri Borman author of the children’s book Shapes Go to School and child care provider.  This weeks blog is about the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and Vaccinations.  Per the CDC, “(ASD) is a developmental disability that can cause significant social, communication and behavioral challenges.  There is often nothing about how people with (ASD) look that sets them apart from other people, but people with (ASD) may communicate, interact, behave, and learn in ways that are different from most other people.  The learning, thinking, and problem-solving abilities of people with (ASD) can range from gifted to severely challenged. Some people with (ASD) need a lot of help in their daily lives; others need less.”  (ASD) occurs in all races and ethnic groups, male or female; but it is five times more common among males than among females.

More people than ever are being diagnosed with (ASD), and for over a decade the CDC’s Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring (ADDM) Network has been estimating the number of children with (ASD) in the United States.  In 2002, 1 out of 68 children had (ASD).  The CDC considers (ASD) a serious public health concern and is committed to providing essential data on (ASD), research causes and risk factors, and to establish resources that will help to identify children with (ASD) as early as possible.

The Study to Explore Early Development (SEED) is currently the largest (ASD) study in the United States. “By studying the number of children with (ASD) at different points in time, CDC can find out if the number is rising, dropping, or staying the same. We also can compare the number of children with (ASD) in different areas of the country and among different groups of people. This information can help direct our research into potential factors that might put children at risk for (ASD), and can help communities direct their outreach efforts to those who need it most.”

vaccine  Vaccines do not contribute to or cause (ASD).  Many studies have been done to determine if there is a correlation between vaccinations and (ASD).  The studies continue to prove that vaccinations are not associated with (ASD).  “However, the CDC knows that some parents and others still have concerns. To address these concerns, CDC is part of the Inter-Agency Autism Coordinating Committee (IACC), which is working with the National Vaccine Advisory Committee (NVAC) on this issue. The job of the NVAC is to advise and make recommendations regarding the National Vaccine Program. Communication between the IACC and NVAC will allow each group to share skills and knowledge, improve coordination, and promote better use of research resources on vaccine topics.”

anaphylactic-shock1  Vaccines may not cause (ASD), but they can have adverse side effects.  If you suffer from an adverse side effect, like anaphylatic shock, you could be entitled to compensation.  The Vaccine Injury Table makes it easier for people to get compensation.  The Table lists injuries or conditions that are considered to be caused by vaccines.  It also lists time periods in which the first symptom of these injuries or conditions must occur after receiving the vaccine.  For example, if you received the MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine and had a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) within 4 hours after receiving the vaccine, then if no other cause is found, it is diagnosed that the MMR vaccine caused the injury.

“If your injury/condition is not on the Table or if your injury/condition did not occur within the time period on the Table, you must prove that the vaccine caused the injury/condition. Such proof must be based on medical records or opinion, which may include expert witness testimony.

§100.3   Vaccine injury table.

(a) In accordance with section 312(b) of the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986, title III of Pub. L. 99-660, 100 Stat. 3779 (42 U.S.C. 300aa-1 note) and section 2114(c) of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 300aa-14(c)), the following is a table of vaccines, the injuries, disabilities, illnesses, conditions, and deaths resulting from the administration of such vaccines, and the time period in which the first symptom or manifestation of onset or of the significant aggravation of such injuries, disabilities, illnesses, conditions, and deaths is to occur after vaccine administration for purposes of receiving compensation under the Program:

Vaccine Injury Table

Vaccine Illness, disability, injury or condition covered Time period for first symptom or manifestation of onset or of significant aggravation after vaccine administration
I. Vaccines containing tetanus toxoid (e.g., DTaP, DTP, DT, Td, or TT) A. Anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock 4 hours.
B. Brachial Neuritis 2-28 days.
C. Any acute complication or sequela (including death) of an illness, disability, injury, or condition referred to above which illness, disability, injury, or condition arose within the time period prescribed Not applicable.
II. Vaccines containing whole cell pertussis bacteria, extracted or partial cell pertussis bacteria, or specific pertussis antigen(s) (e.g., DTP, DTaP, P, DTP-Hib) A. Anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock 4 hours.
B. Encephalopathy (or encephalitis) 72 hours.
C. Any acute complication or sequela (including death) of an illness, disability, injury, or condition referred to above which illness, disability, injury, or condition arose within the time period prescribed Not applicable.
III. Measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine or any of its components (e.g., MMR, MR, A. Anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shockM, R) B. Encephalopathy (or encephalitis) 4 hours.
B. Encephalopathy (or encephalitis) 5-15 days (not less than 5 days and not more than 15 days).
C. Any acute complication or sequela (including death) of an illness, disability, injury, or condition referred to above which illness, disability, injury, or condition arose within the time period prescribed Not applicable.
IV. Vaccines containing rubella virus (e.g., MMR, MR, R) A. Chronic arthritis 7-42 days.
B. Any acute complication or sequela (including death) of an illness, disability, injury, or condition referred to above which illness, disability, injury, or condition arose within the time period prescribed Not applicable.
V. Vaccines containing measles virus (e.g., MMR, MR, M) A. Thrombocytopenic purpura 7-30 days.
B. Vaccine-Strain Measles Viral Infection in an immunodeficient recipient 6 months.
C. Any acute complication or sequela (including death) of an illness, disability, injury, or condition referred to above which illness, disability, injury, or condition arose within the time period prescribed Not applicable.
VI. Vaccines containing polio live virus (OPV) A. Paralytic Polio
  —in a non-immunodeficient recipient 30 days.
—in an immunodeficient recipient 6 months.
—in a vaccine associated community case Not applicable.
B. Vaccine-Strain Polio Viral Infection
—in a non-immunodeficient recipient 30 days.
—in an immunodeficient recipient 6 months.
—in a vaccine associated community case Not applicable.
C. Any acute complication or sequela (including death) of an illness, disability, injury, or condition referred to above which illness, disability, injury, or condition arose within the time period prescribed Not applicable.
VII. Vaccines containing polio inactivated virus (e.g., IPV) A. Anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock 4 hours
B. Any acute complication or sequela (including death of an illness, disability, injury, or condition referred to above which illness, disability, injury, or condition arose within the time period prescribed. Not applicable.
VIII. Hepatitis B. vaccines A. Anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock 4 hours.
B. Any acute complication or sequela (including death) of an illness, disability, injury, or condition referred to above which illness, disability, injury, or condition arose within the time period prescribed Not applicable.
IX. Hemophilus influenzae type b polysaccharide conjugate vaccines No Condition Specified Not applicable.
X. Varicella vaccine No Condition Specified Not applicable.
XI. Rotavirus vaccine No Condition Specified Not applicable.
XII. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines No Condition Specified Not applicable.
XIII. Hepatitis A vaccines No Condition Specified Not applicable.
XIV. Trivalent influenza vaccines No Condition Specified Not applicable.
XV. Meningococcal vaccines No Condition Specified Not applicable.
XVI. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines No Condition Specified Not applicable.
XVII. Any new vaccine recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for routine administration to children, after publication by the Secretary of a notice of coverage* No Condition Specified Not applicable.

*Now includes all vaccines against seasonal influenza (except trivalent influenza vaccines, which are already covered), effective November 12, 2013.

(b) Qualifications and aids to interpretation. The following qualifications and aids to interpretation shall apply to the Vaccine Injury Table to paragraph (a) of this section:

(1) Anaphylaxis and anaphylactic shock. For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, Anaphylaxis and anaphylactic shock mean an acute, severe, and potentially lethal systemic allergic reaction. Most cases resolve without sequelae. Signs and symptoms begin minutes to a few hours after exposure. Death, if it occurs, usually results from airway obstruction caused by laryngeal edema or bronchospasm and may be associated with cardiovascular collapse. Other significant clinical signs and symptoms may include the following: Cyanosis, hypotension, bradycardia, tachycardia, arrhythmia, edema of the pharynx and/or trachea and/or larynx with stridor and dyspnea. Autopsy findings may include acute emphysema which results from lower respiratory tract obstruction, edema of the hypopharynx, epiglottis, larynx, or trchea and minimal findings of eosinophilia in the liver, spleen and lungs. When death occurs within minutes of exposure and without signs of respiratory distress, there may not be significant pathologic findings.

(2) Encephalopathy. For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, a vaccine recipient shall be considered to have suffered an encephalopathy only if such recipient manifests, within the applicable period, an injury meeting the description below of an acute encephalopathy, and then a chronic encephalopathy persists in such person for more than 6 months beyond the date of vaccination.

(i) An acute encephalopathy is one that is sufficiently severe so as to require hospitalization (whether or not hospitalization occurred).

(A) For children less than 18 months of age who present without an associated seizure event, an acute encephalopathy is indicated by a significantly decreased level of consciousness lasting for at least 24 hours. Those children less than 18 months of age who present following a seizure shall be viewed as having an acute encephalopathy if their significantly decreased level of consciousness persists beyond 24 hours and cannot be attributed to a postictal state (seizure) or medication.

(B) For adults and children 18 months of age or older, an acute encephalopathy is one that persists for at least 24 hours and characterized by at least two of the following:

(1) A significant change in mental status that is not medication related; specifically a confusional state, or a delirium, or a psychosis;

(2) A significantly decreased level of consciousness, which is independent of a seizure and cannot be attributed to the effects of medication; and

(3) A seizure associated with loss of consciousness.

(C) Increased intracranial pressure may be a clinical feature of acute encephalopathy in any age group.

(D) A “significantly decreased level of consciousness” is indicated by the presence of at least one of the following clinical signs for at least 24 hours or greater (see paragraphs (b)(2)(i)(A) and (b)(2)(i)(B) of this section for applicable timeframes):

(1) Decreased or absent response to environment (responds, if at all, only to loud voice or painful stimuli);

(2) Decreased or absent eye contact (does not fix gaze upon family members or other individuals); or

(3) Inconsistent or absent responses to external stimuli (does not recognize familiar people or things).

(E) The following clinical features alone, or in combination, do not demonstrate an acute encephalopathy or a significant change in either mental status or level of consciousness as described above: Sleepiness, irritability (fussiness), high-pitched and unusual screaming, persistent inconsolable crying, and bulging fontanelle. Seizures in themselves are not sufficient to constitute a diagnosis of encephalopathy. In the absence of other evidence of an acute encephalopathy, seizures shall not be viewed as the first symptom or manifestation of the onset of an acute encephalopathy.

(ii) Chronic Encephalopathy occurs when a change in mental or neurologic status, first manifested during the applicable time period, persists for a period of at least 6 months from the date of vaccination. Individuals who return to a normal neurologic state after the acute encephalopathy shall not be presumed to have suffered residual neurologic damage from that event; any subsequent chronic encephalopathy shall not be presumed to be a sequela of the acute encephalopathy. If a preponderance of the evidence indicates that a child’s chronic encephalopathy is secondary to genetic, prenatal or perinatal factors, that chronic encephalopathy shall not be considered to be a condition set forth in the Table.

(iii) An encephalopathy shall not be considered to be a condition set forth in the Table if in a proceeding on a petition, it is shown by a preponderance of the evidence that the encephalopathy was caused by an infection, a toxin, a metabolic disturbance, a structural lesion, a genetic disorder or trauma (without regard to whether the cause of the infection, toxin, trauma, metabolic disturbance, structural lesion or genetic disorder is known). If at the time a decision is made on a petition filed under section 2111(b) of the Act for a vaccine-related injury or death, it is not possible to determine the cause by a preponderance of the evidence of an encephalopathy, the encephalopathy shall be considered to be a condition set forth in the Table.

(iv) In determining whether or not an encephalopathy is a condition set forth in the Table, the Court shall consider the entire medical record.

(3) [Reserved]

(4) Seizure and convulsion. For purposes of paragraphs (b) (2) of this section, the terms, “seizure” and “convulsion” include myoclonic, generalized tonic-clonic (grand mal), and simple and complex partial seizures. Absence (petit mal) seizures shall not be considered to be a condition set forth in the Table. Jerking movements or staring episodes alone are not necessarily an indication of seizure activity.

(5) Sequela. The term “sequela” means a condition or event which was actually caused by a condition listed in the Vaccine Injury Table.

(6) Chronic Arthritis. (i) For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, chronic arthritis may be found in a person with no history in the 3 years prior to vaccination of arthropathy (joint disease) on the basis of:

(A) Medical documentation, recorded within 30 days after the onset, of objective signs of acute arthritis (joint swelling) that occurred between 7 and 42 days after a rubella vaccination;

(B) Medical documentation (recorded within 3 years after the onset of acute arthritis) of the persistence of objective signs of intermittent or continuous arthritis for more than 6 months following vaccination; and

(C) Medical documentation of an antibody response to the rubella virus.

(ii) For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, the following shall not be considered as chronic arthritis: Musculoskeletal disorders such as diffuse connective tissue diseases (including but not limited to rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, mixed connective tissue disease, polymyositis/determatomyositis, fibromyalgia, necrotizing vascultitis and vasculopathies and Sjögren’s Syndrome), degenerative joint disease, infectious agents other than rubella (whether by direct invasion or as an immune reaction) metabolic and endocrine diseases, trauma, neoplasms, neuropathic disorders, bone and cartilage disorders and arthritis associated with ankylosing spondylitis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, Reiter’s syndrome, or blood disorders.

(iii) Arthralgia (joint pain) or stiffness without joint swelling shall not be viewed as chronic arthritis for purposes of paragraph (a) of this section.

(7) Brachial neuritis. (i) This term is defined as dysfunction limited to the upper extremity nerve plexus (i.e., its trunks, divisions, or cords) without involvement of other peripheral (e.g., nerve roots or a single peripheral nerve) or central (e.g., spinal cord) nervous system structures. A deep, steady, often severe aching pain in the shoulder and upper arm usually heralds onset of the condition. The pain is followed in days or weeks by weakness and atrophy in upper extremity muscle groups. Sensory loss may accompany the motor deficits, but is generally a less notable clinical feature. The neuritis, or plexopathy, may be present on the same side as or the opposite side of the injection; it is sometimes bilateral, affecting both upper extremities.

(ii) Weakness is required before the diagnosis can be made. Motor, sensory, and reflex findings on physical examination and the results of nerve conduction and electromyographic studies must be consistent in confirming that dysfunction is attributable to the brachial plexus. The condition should thereby be distinguishable from conditions that may give rise to dysfunction of nerve roots (i.e., radiculopathies) and peripheral nerves (i.e., including multiple monoeuropathies), as well as other peripheral and central nervous system structures (e.g., cranial neuropathies and myelopathies).

(8) Thrombocytopenic purpura. This term is defined by a serum platelet count less than 50,000/mm3. Thrombocytopenic purpura does not include cases of thrombocytopenia associated with other causes such as hypersplenism, autoimmune disorders (including alloantibodies from previous transfusions) myelodysplasias, lymphoproliferative disorders, congenital thrombocytopenia or hemolytic uremic syndrome. This does not include cases of immune (formerly called idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) that are mediated, for example, by viral or fungal infections, toxins or drugs. Thrombocytopenic purpura does not include cases of thrombocytopenia associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation, as observed with bacterial and viral infections. Viral infections include, for example, those infections secondary to Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, hepatitis A and B, rhinovirus, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), adenovirus, and dengue virus. An antecedent viral infection may be demonstrated by clinical signs and symptoms and need not be confirmed by culture or serologic testing. Bone marrow examination, if performed, must reveal a normal or an increased number of megakaryocytes in an otherwise normal marrow.

(9) Vaccine-strain measles viral infection. This term is defined as a disease caused by the vaccine-strain that should be determined by vaccine-specific monoclonal antibody or polymerase chain reaction tests.

(10) Vaccine-strain polio viral infection. This term is defined as a disease caused by poliovirus that is isolated from the affected tissue and should be determined to be the vaccine-strain by oligonucleotide or polymerase chain reaction. Isolation of poliovirus from the stool is not sufficient to establish a tissue specific infection or disease caused by vaccine-strain poliovirus.

(c) Coverage provisions. (1) Except as provided in paragraph (c)(2), (3), (4), (5), (6), or (7) of this section, the revised Table of Injuries set forth in paragraph (a) of this section and the Qualifications and Aids to Interpretation set forth in paragraph (b) of this section apply to petitions for compensation under the Program filed with the United States Court of Federal Claims on or after March 24, 1997. Petitions for compensation filed before such date shall be governed by section 2114(a) and (b) of the Public Health Service Act as in effect on January 1, 1995, or by §100.3 as in effect on March 10, 1995 (see 60 FR 7678, et seq., February 8, 1995), as applicable.

(2) Hepatitis B, Hib, and varicella vaccines (Items VIII, IX, and X of the Table) are included in the Table as of August 6, 1997.

(3) Rotavirus vaccines (Item XI of the Table) are included in the Table as of October 22, 1998.

(4) Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (Item XII of the Table) are included in the Table as of December 18, 1999.

(5) Hepatitis A vaccines (Item XIII of the Table) are included on the Table as of December 1, 2004.

(6) Trivalent influenza vaccines (Item XIV of the Table) are included on the Table as of July 1, 2005.

(7) Meningococcal vaccines and human papillomavirus vaccines (Items XV and XVI of the Table) are included on the Table as of February 1, 2007.

(8) Other new vaccines (Item XVII of the Table) will be included in the Table as of the effective date of a tax enacted to provide funds for compensation paid with respect to such vaccines. An amendment to this section will be published in the Federal Register to announce the effective date of such a tax.

[60 FR 7694, Feb. 8, 1995, as amended at 62 FR 7688, Feb. 20, 1997; 62 FR 10626, Mar. 7, 1997; 63 FR 25778, May 11, 1998; 64 FR 40518, July 27, 1999; 67 FR 48559, July 25, 2002; 73 FR 59530, Oct. 9, 2008; 76 FR 36368, June 22, 2011]”

Guides and Resources

What You Need to Know about the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program – English (PDF – 1.36 MB)

Lo que usted necesita saber sobre el Programa Nacional de Compensación por Daños Derivados de Vacunas – Spanish (PDF – 1.39 MB)

Childhood Immunization Information for Consumers (National Library of Medicine MEDLINEPlus)

U.S. National Vaccine Plan

Omnibus Autism Proceeding

Review of Adverse Effects of Vaccines

http://www.iom.edu/Reports/2013/The-Childhood-Immunization-Schedule-and-Safety.aspx

http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/index.html

Learn more about CDC’s tracking of the number of children with ASD »

00B0B_dGlSBFfHl9M_600x450 It’s the very first day of Kindergarten for the shape children.  The teacher, Miss Heart, has asked each student to introduce themselves.  One by one each shape stands up and talks about themselves.  “Shapes Go to School” is a beautifully illustrated children’s book that teaches shapes and colors.  Order your copy of “Shapes Go to School” today!  Just click on the picture of the book!

Hey, What’s the Big IDEA?

idea4Hi this is Terri Borman child care provider and author of “Shapes Go to School.” This week’s blog is about IDEA, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. IDEA is a United States federal law and it regulates how states and public agencies will provide early intervention to children ages 0-3 and special education and related services to children with disabilities from ages 3-21.

idea 3IDEA considers autism, intellectual disabilities, hearing impairments including deafness, speech or language impairments, visual impairments including blindness, serious emotional disturbances, orthopedic impairments, traumatic brain injuries, and other health impairments disabilities and because of these disabilities these children need special education and related services.

Children with the disabilities listed above are automatically protected by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Children that have disabilities but do not qualify for special education services under IDEA may however qualify for accommodations or modifications under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

There is a “zero rejection” rule.  The courts have ruled that no child even if the child is completely incapable of benefiting from educational services for example, the child is unconscious or even in a coma, will be denied educational services.

In Texas, we have a state run program called ECI which stands for Early Childhood Intervention.  ECI takes comprehensive evaluations and provides services for children who qualify from ages 0-3.  At age 3, the school district that the child is zoned for will do their own evaluations and take over the services to children who still qualify.  The ECI team that evaluates the child and plans services includes licensed or credentialed early intervention specialists, speech and language pathologists, physical and occupational therapists, psychologists, registered nurses, dietitians, social workers, and counselors.

As a child care provider, it is important for me to communicate with parents and let them know that I have concerns about their child and I will recommend ECI for an evaluation.  There have been children in my care that were developmentally behind and the parents chose not to have them evaluated and that child really struggled when they started school at age 5.  It’s unfortunate because they could have gotten so much help earlier.

So if you are a child care provider and you have some concerns about a child in your care, talk to the parents and inform them of the services available to their children either through a state run agency like ECI who provides services for children up to age 3 or through the school district they are zoned for that provides services for children ages 3 and up. 

If you are a parent and you have any concerns, call your state run agency and/or your school district and have your child evaluated. The evaluation is free and if your child qualifies for some services, it would be so much better to start early than to wait.

cropped-9781481758178.jpg It’s the very first day of Kindergarten for the shape children.  The teacher, Miss Heart, has asked each student to introduce themselves.  One by one each shape stands up and talks about themselves.  “Shapes Go to School” is a beautifully illustrated children’s book that teaches shapes and colors.  Order your copy of “Shapes Go to School” today!  Just click on the picture of the book!

School’s Going To Be Out But Don’t Pull Your Hair Out: Fun Activities to Keep Your Kids Active.

     Hi this is Terri Borman, childcare provider and author of “Shapes Go to School.”  This week’s blog is about planning activities for your school aged children during the summer break from school.   Don’t just let them sit at home idle, playing video games, and watching TV.  Get them engaged and out of the house doing some fun activities. 

     Right now is the perfect time to start planning and registering for these activities because they will fill up fast. There are so many camps available to choose from and the internet is a great place to find them.  Look for camps that would interest your child.  It makes no difference on your child’s age; there is something for all kids Kindergarten to 12th grade.

art camp  There are art camps available for those creative art and crafty kids.

3d animation camp  There are camps available at college universities.  This camp was last year summer of 2013 at SMU (Southern Methodist University) for students in grades 1 through 12.  Just look at all the choices.

  • 3D Animation, Digital Gaming, Movie Makers & Fab-Lab
  • CSI Forensics, Myth Breakers, Rockets & Flight
  • LEGO® Car Rally, Goofy Gizmos, Battlestorm & Mindstorm
  • LEGO® Architects, Mosaix, Friends & Pet-Bots
  • Cartooning, Drawing, Painting & Fashion Sketching
  • Math, Reading, Writing, Spelling & Literature Enhancement Skills
  • Think and Speak Up, Mind Your Manners, Social & Study Skills
  • SAT/ACT Test Preparation, College Planning & Applications
  • Allaka Zzam Magic Camp, Puppetry, Music & More
  • “Extended Day” options also available.

Chinese Camps  There are Chinese and martial arts camps.  Keeping your children active and teaching them discipline and self defense builds self-esteem and confidence.

circus camp  There are circus summer camps.  Let your child run away to the circus for one week.

dance 2 camp  There are dance camps.

Diva rock star camp  There are Diva Rock Star summer camps.

  Become a real rock star at School of Rock’s summer camps.

ice skating camps  There are ice skating summer camps.

horseriding camp  There are horse riding summer camps.

natural museum camps  Summer camps are available at your Natural Science and History Museums.

iphone and android app camp  There are iD (internal drive) Tech summer camps that will teach kids how to make IPhone Apps and Android Apps.  Your kids are always downloading and playing Apps from the App store.  Let them create their own.

science camp  There are summer science camps which range from making ooey gooey stuff to building robots.

swimming camps There are summer swimming camps.

water park camps  There are summer camps offered by your local water parks.

fort worth zoo There are summer camps offered by your local zoo.

sports camps  There are summer camps offered for every sport.

lake summer camp  There are action packed and full of adventure summer camps offered at your local lakes. 

00B0B_dGlSBFfHl9M_600x450“Shapes Go to School” is a beautifully illustrated children’s book that teaches shapes and colors.  It’s the very first day of Kindergarten for the shape children.  Some shapes are excited to be at school while others are apprehensive.  Order your copy of “Shapes Go to School” today!  Just click on the picture of the book!

 

Stages of Child Development: Is Your Child On Track?

child developmentHi this is Terri Borman, childcare provider and author of “Shapes Go to School.”  This week’s blog is about the stages of child development.  First, I must tell you about my book.

00B0B_dGlSBFfHl9M_600x450“Shapes Go to School” is a beautifully illustrated children’s book that teaches shapes, colors and diversity.  It helps children to understand that everyone is different.  It’s the very first day of Kindergarten for the shape children.  Some shapes are excited to be at school while others are apprehensive.  Order your copy of “Shapes Go to School” today!  Just click on the picture of the book.

Now let’s get back to child development.  I am going to go over the stages of child development from birth to age five.  Please keep in mind that the time frames listed for achieving developmental milestones are estimated.  Some children may achieve various developmental milestones earlier or later than the estimated time frames but still fall within the normal parameters.  This information is designed with the intention to help parents understand what to expect from their child.  Any questions or concerns you may have about your child’s development should be shared with his/her pediatrician.

Birth to one month: A newborn to one month of age will eat approximately five to eight times per day and sleep approximately 20 hours.  The infant will make basic distinctions in vision, hearing, smelling, tasting, touch, temperature, and pain.  An infant at this age will not be sociable. 

Two to three months:  At two to three months, the infant can perceive different colors and explore visually and orally.  Verbally the infant can cry, coo and grunt.   They can lift their heads when on tummy and kick arms and legs.  They are starting to be sociable and will smile at a face.

Four to Six months:  Between four and six months the infant will start babbling and eat between three and five times per day.  They are more able to control their head and arm movements, grasp objects and roll over.  They can recognize familiar persons and they expect to be fed, bathed and dressed.  They will help hold the bottle during feeding.

Seven to Nine Months:  Between seven and nine months the infant can sit without support and crawl around. They enjoy playing Peek-a-boo and may start to have separation anxiety.

Ten to Twelve Months: Between ten and twelve months, the infant can pull up to stand, says one or two words but knows up to five or six words, imitate sounds and respond to simple commands.  They can eat table food now, three meals and two snacks a day.  They will sleep twelve hours at night and take two naps during the day.  They are very curious and want to explore their surroundings.  Uh-Oh they may have fear of strangers, AKA stranger danger.  They can wave bye-bye, play pat-a-cake and they understand when you tell them “No!”  They may give a toy to a friend or take it away.

Twelve to Eighteen Months:  No longer an infant!  These toddlers are much more independent.  They can walk without help, eat by themselves and say a few more words.  Watch out!  They can also go up the stairs.  They can still experience separation anxiety and may now fear taking a bath.   They can scribble scrabble on paper with crayons.

Eighteen to Twenty-Four Months:  At eighteen and twenty-four months, they can run, kick a ball and build a 6 cube tower.  They are capable of being potty trained.  They can take off their shoes, socks and gloves.  They have a vocabulary of more than 200 words and say two to three word sentences.  They will still sleep twelve hours at night with a one to two hour nap during the day.  They may start having temper tantrums when things don’t go their way and might do the opposite when asked to do something.

Two Years to Three Years:  Between two and three years, they can jump off a step and ride a tricycle.  They can feed themselves with eating utensils.  They can properly use crayons and color with a purpose.  They can build a 9-10 cube tower.  They can put on their shoes closer to three years of age.  They are using short sentences.  They may still have separation anxiety and violent temper tantrums.  They can also have a sense of humor and play tricks.  They can be possessive of toys but mostly enjoy playing alongside other children.  They like more than anything staying on a routine.

Three Years to Four Years:  Between three and four years, they can stand on one leg, jump up and down, draw a circle or a cross on a piece of paper, and open doors.   They are very self-sufficient in many routines and completely potty trained.  They like to show affection to their parents and other caregivers.  They may start being afraid of the dark.  Most 3 to 4 year old children like to share with other children and play dramatic play.  They will speak in three to five word sentences.

Four Years to Five Years:  Between four and five years of age they have mastered their motor control.  They can skip and take big jumps.  They can dress themselves.  They can read and write and draw shapes on paper.  They feel guilt and pride when they accomplish something.  They are very sociable and competitive.  They speak clearly now and they have mastered basic grammar skills.  They know over 2000 words.

I have put together an assessment that you can print out and use to check off your own child’s milestones.  This assessment is also great for child care providers to use to assess the children in their care.   Click on the link below.  Remember if you notice something that your child is not able to do when the assessment says just be patient it’s an estimate.  Practice that task with your child and/or consult your child’s pediatrician.

Child Development Assessment (Click here for a free printable child development assessment!)

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